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Online learning: NSW central, southern and southwest—Introduction

The introduction gives a summary of the annual control program and describes the worm control regions and worms encountered here.

Structured reading

For those who like to see all the information and simply read through it in order. Each heading is a link to a page of information—the dot point provides a summary of the page.

Tip: Keep this page open and open the links in new tabs.

NSW central, southern and southwest: Program summary
What to do and when to do it for an annual worm control program in this region. Day-to-day drenching decisions will use the Drench Decision Guide (see topic: Deciding when to drench and what drench to use).

NSW central, southern and southwest: Introduction
Information about the location, subregions and worms typically encountered here.

Question and answer

For those who prefer a problem based approach to learning, answer the following questions.
Each of the questions below links further down the page to the answers.

Questions:

  1. What are the 5 strategies used to control worms in NSW Non-Seasonal Rainfall?
  2. What are the most important worms in this region?

Answers:

You can also click on each question below to go to WormBoss pages with related information.

1. What are the 5 strategies used to control worms in NSW Non-Seasonal Rainfall?

  1. Use a strategic drenching program
  2. WormTest at recommended times
  3. Use grazing management to create low worm-risk paddocks
  4. Breed and feed for worm-resistant goats
  5. Manage drench resistance

2. What are the most important worms in this region?

The most important roundworms in this region are:

In very wet years and in areas with non-seasonal rainfall tending to summer dominance (e.g. the Monaro), especially with more than 700 mm average annual rainfall:

Also important but mainly for young sheep

Barber’s pole worm

In this region, barber's pole worm is generally sporadic and of short duration, therefore the annual requirement for the vaccine that protects against barber’s pole worm is less certain compared to 4–6 weekly monitoring of worm egg counts during high risk periods and treatment with a short-acting or narrow spectrum drench (seek veterinary advice before using unregistered products).

However, if your farm has periods of high barber's pole worm risk for several months each year (which may occur in coastal areas or on irrigated pastures) seek veterinary advice as to whether the vaccine program against barber’s pole worm should be considered.

Liver fluke

Liver fluke is an internal parasite that occurs throughout this region where there are colonies of the intermediate host snail Austropeplea (Lymnaea) tomentosa. It can affect goats severely, sometimes causing deaths. The life cycle differs from the simple life cycle of roundworms, so control strategies are different.  Liver fluke should be considered if there are cases of anaemia or bottle jaw in goats that are not associated with barber’s pole worm. To control liver fluke, see Liver fluke control.


Links to the learning topics for NSW central, southern and southwest

  1. Introduction (you are currently on this page)
  2. Grazing management
  3. Breeding for worm resistance
  4. Worm testing
  5. Drenching
  6. Drench resistance management
  7. Goat worms