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WormBoss worm control program for goats

Rangelands


 



Grazing management

In this region grazing management is not routinely used as a preventative strategy to reduce exposure of goats to worms as pasture contamination with worm larvae is usually low and the extensive nature of properties makes it almost impossible. However, under certain conditions, much higher levels of worm contamination on the pasture can occur, resulting in goats being affected by worms.

NOTE: goats can also be infected by the brown stomach worm (Ostertagia ostertagi) from cattle, unlike the situation with sheep and lambsSo where possible, i.e. where the country will support cattle, use adult cattle in multi-grazing situations as they do not carry worms. 

 

These conditions are:

  • provide adequate browse to enable goats to graze at least 10 cm above the ground i.e. on forage or longer pastures.
  • higher than normal rainfall, especially in successive seasons and years.
  • flooding causing ground to be waterlogged (resulting in worm eggs hatching despite no rainfall).
  • flooding or fires causing goats to congregate on smaller areas.
  • tall grass and strong winds causing goats to congregate in corners of paddocks.
  • preferential grazing of green pick along the wet areas of bore drains or irrigation channels when there is little other feed in the paddock.

 When these above conditions occur

  • WormTest goats or monitor body condition and eye mucous membrane colour (FAMACHA© score) - (see When to WormTest and when to drench’).
  • Move goats from areas where they have congregated as soon as possible.

Effective grazing management reduces the exposure of goats to worms. There are four basic steps:

  • Avoid grazing on paddocks heavily contaminated with worm larvae
  • Reduce contamination of paddocks with worm eggs
  • Allow time for most of the eggs and larvae on the pasture to die
  • Where possible, provide adequate browse