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WormBoss

Drench Decision Guide

Australian Smallholders

Please confirm that you have read the disclaimer details below and accept the conditions of use of the Drench Decision Guide before proceeding.

DownloadDownload a copy of the Australian smallholder Drench Decision Guide (293 KB)
Disclaimer:
Future events cannot reliably be predicted accurately. The University of New England ("UNE") and Meat & Livestock Australia Limited ("MLA") make no statement, representations or warranties about the accuracy or completeness of, and you should not rely on any information relating to the Drench Decision Guide for Goats ('Information'). UNE and MLA disclaim all responsibility for the Information and all liability (including without limitation liability and negligence) for all expenses, costs, losses and damages you may incur as a result of the Information being inaccurate or incomplete in any way for any reason. Published October 2016 © The University of New England and Meat & Livestock Australia Limited 2016.
Is this goat a kid, a young goat from weaning to 18 months of age, a buck, or a doe during late pregnancy and lactation?

Is this goat showing any of these signs at the described level[1]?
  • FAMACHA Score of 3 or 4 or 5 (pale and anaemic)
  • Body Condition Score of 2.5 or less (poor condition)
  • Faecal Consistency Score of 5 (watery diarrhoea)

1Indicators of worms

FAMACHA Score

This assesses an animal's level of anaemia, which results from barber's pole worm (and some other causes). A card with 5 blocks of colour (1=red, 2=red-pink, 3=pink, 4=pink-creamy white and 5=creamy white) are compared to the colour of the mucus membranes (conjunctiva) inside the lower eyelid. More information.

Body Condition Score Score

This assesses the level of body fat as an indicator of general condition. It is done by feeling for fatness over the backboane and short ribs. More information.

Faecal Consistency Score or scouring

This assesses the wateriness or sloppiness of the faeces as an indication of scourworms. More information.

Is this goat showing any of these signs at the described level[1]?
  • FAMACHA Score of 4 or 5 (pale and anaemic)
  • Body Condition Score of 2 or less (poor condition)
  • Faecal Consistency Score of 5 (watery diarrhoea)

1Indicators of worms

FAMACHA Score

This assesses an animal's level of anaemia, which results from barber's pole worm (and some other causes). A card with 5 blocks of colour (1=red, 2=red-pink, 3=pink, 4=pink-creamy white and 5=creamy white) are compared to the colour of the mucus membranes (conjunctiva) inside the lower eyelid. More information.

Body Condition Score Score

This assesses the level of body fat as an indicator of general condition. It is done by feeling for fatness over the backboane and short ribs. More information.

Faecal Consistency Score or scouring

This assesses the wateriness or sloppiness of the faeces as an indication of scourworms. More information.

WormBoss Drench Decision Guide Report

Region: Australian Smallholders

Date: %23 %Sep %2017

Your Selections

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Your Recommended Action

Drench this goat now with an effective combination treatment.[1]

Generally, this should be a short-acting product.

However, if this is a high-risk time for barber’s pole worm and the goat is in one of the following situations, a) a coastal area, (b) on irrigated pasture, or (c) in a summer rainfall region, then consider a long-acting product (in other areas a short-acting product should be sufficient).

If you have other goats, ensure they are also assessed because individuals can vary considerably in their susceptibility to worms.

Continue checking regularly

In barber’s pole worm areas
Check FAMACHA Score weekly during high worm-risk periods to monthly during low worm risk periods.
At the same time, check for watery scours (Faecal Consistency Score 5).
Check Body Condition Score (BCS) monthly.

In scour worm areas
Check Body Condition Score and Scouring monthly.
Be aware that in some districts that have a warmer and wetter spring or summer than usual, that barber’s pole worm may be a serious problem in summer and autumn. In such areas, include FAMACHA checking weekly to fortnightly in summer and autumn.

If you are unable to regularly assess and treat goats on an individual basis, use the regional Drench Decision Guide for your area and monitor your mob with worm egg counts.

No treatment is currently recommended for this goat.

Continue checking regularly

In barber’s pole worm areas
Check FAMACHA Score weekly during high worm-risk periods to monthly during low worm risk periods.
At the same time, check for watery scours (Faecal Consistency Score 5).
Check Body Condition Score (BCS) monthly.

In scour worm areas
Check Body Condition Score and Scouring monthly.
Be aware that in some districts that have a warmer and wetter spring or summer than usual, that barber’s pole worm may be a serious problem in summer and autumn. In such areas, include FAMACHA checking weekly to fortnightly in summer and autumn.

If you are unable to regularly assess and treat goats on an individual basis, use the regional Drench Decision Guide for your area and monitor your mob with worm egg counts.

This recommendation should be read with the information provided below.


1Guidelines for worm control treatments

When using anthelmintic products in goats, obtain a veterinary prescription because: 

  • Goats require a different dose rate and withholding period to that on the label.
  • Many drenches are not registered for use in goats (see exceptions below).

Victoria: over the counter drenches can be used if residues are kept below the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL).

South Australia: cattle drenches can be used in goats, but pour-on formulations should be avoided.

When giving all treatments

Follow the product labels or veterinarian’s instructions. Dose to the heaviest goat in the group. Calibrate equipment to ensure the right dose is delivered with the right procedures. Do not mix drenches unless the label states they are compatible. Check and comply with withholding periods and export slaughter intervals.

Choosing treatment options on your property

Use these principles together, where possible:

  1. Use drenches tested to be most effective on your property and either multi-active products or more than one active concurrently (up the race with one and then the other); if drench effectiveness is unknown, conduct a DrenchCheck-Day10 after drenching.
  2. Use short-acting treatments—reserve long-acting products for specific purposes or high worm-risk times.

For more details read the drench resistance section in the WormBoss Worm Control Program.

Check effectiveness of long-acting treatments

Use only under veterinary prescription.

WormTest with a culture at 35, 60 and 90 days after treatment.

If WormTest results are 100 epg or above, drench resistance is likely. Drench immediately with an effective short-acting drench with a different drench group to the long-acting treatment. Seek veterinary advice on the further use of this product. If WormTest results are less than 100 epg, then treat with an exit drench at 100 days after the long-acting treatment was given.

Seek veterinary advice if WormTests are positive at or before 60 days.

Primer and exit drenches

These help to slow drench resistance to persistent treatments.

Protection period of persistent treatments for sheep

(goat times are unknown, but likely much shorter as goats metabolise the drugs faster)

Mid-length: 7–28 days. Long-acting: 91–100 days.

NOTE: The protection period against susceptible black scour worm with a long-acting moxidectin injection is 49 days in sheep, but is not set in goats.

Use a primer before long-acting treatments

Primer drenches (effective short-acting treatments that do not include the drench group in the long-acting treatment) should be given concurrently with all long-acting treatments.

Use an exit drench after all mid-length and long-acting treatments

  • Treat with an ‘exit drench’—an effective short-acting treatment that does not include the drench group in the mid-length or long-acting treatment. Also called a ‘tail-cutter’ drench.
  • Give this at 42 days (mid-length) or 100 days (long-acting) after the treatment was given.
  • WormTest 4–6 weeks after the exit drench.

Anytime that you are concerned that the persistent treatment is not providing protection, WormTest immediately and seek veterinary advice regarding drench resistance.