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WormBoss

Drench Decision Guide

Western Australia

Please confirm that you have read the disclaimer details below and accept the conditions of use of the Drench Decision Guide before proceeding.

DownloadPrint a copy of the Western Australia Drench Decision Guide (326 KB)
Disclaimer:
Future events cannot reliably be predicted accurately. The University of New England ("UNE") and Meat & Livestock Australia Limited ("MLA") make no statement, representations or warranties about the accuracy or completeness of, and you should not rely on any information relating to the Drench Decision Guide for Goats ('Information'). UNE and MLA disclaim all responsibility for the Information and all liability (including without limitation liability and negligence) for all expenses, costs, losses and damages you may incur as a result of the Information being inaccurate or incomplete in any way for any reason. Published October 2016 © The University of New England and Meat & Livestock Australia Limited 2016.
In which WormBoss zone are these goats?
(refer to map)

1The Western Australian region

The Western Australian region
Are these goats showing signs[1] suggesting a worm infection?

Note: If deaths have occurred, discuss with a veterinarian. Treatment may be recommended before a WormTest is conducted, although a test will be needed for confirmation.


1Signs of worms

Scour worms (black scour worm [Trichostrongylus species]; brown stomach worm [Teladorsagia circumcincta]; and others [incl. Nematodirus]): dark scours; weight loss; death.

Barber's pole worm: anaemia (pale inside eyelids and gums); 'bottle jaw' (swelling under the jaw); lethargy, lagging or collapse when mustered; death.

NOTE: Other diseases and poor nutrition can cause similar signs. Seek veterinary advice if WormTests do not indicate worms.

Are these kids or weaners (and at which stage)?
Which time or event applies to these adult goats?
Are these goats showing signs[1] suggesting a worm infection?

Note: If deaths have occurred, discuss with a veterinarian. Treatment may be recommended before a WormTest is conducted, although a test will be needed for confirmation.


1Signs of worms

Scour worms (black scour worm [Trichostrongylus species]; brown stomach worm [Teladorsagia circumcincta]; and others [incl. Nematodirus]): dark scours; weight loss; death.

Barber's pole worm: anaemia (pale inside eyelids and gums); 'bottle jaw' (swelling under the jaw); lethargy, lagging or collapse when mustered; death.

NOTE: Other diseases and poor nutrition can cause similar signs. Seek veterinary advice if WormTests do not indicate worms.

Are these kids or weaners (and at which stage)?
Which time or event applies to these adult goats?

WormBoss Drench Decision Guide Report

Region: Western Australia

Date: %21 %Oct %2017

Your Selections

History of selection will appear here

Your Recommended Action

Treat with an effective drench[1] and move to a paddock as 'worm-free' as possible and continue to check closely for signs of worms[2]. In 4—6 weeks if the summer drench was due, treat with an effective drench[1]; if not due, WormTest and treat if average worm egg count exceeds 200 epg.

  • Poorer condition goats (average less than Condition Score 2.5): treat now with an effective drench[1] and WormTest in 4—6 weeks time.
  • Moderate/good condition goats (average Condition Score 2.5 or more): WormTest now and drench if average worm egg count exceeds 200 epg, then WormTest in a further 4—6 weeks.

WormTest now rather than drench (as 'hypersensitivity' to worm larvae will not respond to drenching). Treat with an effective drench[1] if average worm egg count exceeds 200 epg.

  • If deaths have occurred, discuss with a veterinarian immediately. If this is not possible, both WormTest (request a barber's pole worm test) and treat with an effective drench[1] immediately, then seek advice.
  • If deaths have not occurred, WormTest now with a barber's pole worm test. Treat with an effective drench[1] if average egg count exceeds 300 epg for weaners and 500 epg for adults, then WormTest again in 4—6 weeks[2].
  • If results show barber's pole worm is not the likely cause of anaemia and the problem persists, seek veterinary advice.

No treatment is required now if kids are developing normally and putting on weight (if not seek veterinary advice). Treat at weaning with an effective drench[1].

Treat at weaning with an effective drench[1] and move to a paddock as 'worm-free' as possible and continue to check closely for signs of worms[2]. In 4—6 weeks if the summer drench is due, treat with an effective drench[1]; if not due, WormTest and treat if the worm egg count exceeds 200 epg.

Treat with an effective summer drench[1] and move to (or leave on) a dry pasture or crop stubble. If no drench resistance test results are current WormTest 10—14 days after the drench to check for complete worm removal.

WormTest at approximately 6-week intervals, starting 6 weeks after the autumn break, until late spring. Treat with an effective drench[1] if average egg count exceeds 300 epg (or a different threshold as agreed with your veterinary advisor).

Treat bucks with an effective drench[1] prior to joining, OR WormTest and treat if average egg count exceeds 100 epg.

Treat goats with an effective drench[1] between the last week of March and mid-April, OR If in good condition (average Condition Score 2.5 or more), WormTest, and then treat with an effective drench[1] if average egg count exceeds 200 epg. (Does: review the Drench Decision Guide again 3 weeks prior to kidding or if there are signs of worms[2]).

No drench is recommended, as worm burdens will be low after the autumn treatment. Review this Drench Decision Guide in late spring or if there are signs of worms[1].

WormTest 3 weeks before kidding starts and treat with an effective drench[1] if average worm egg count exceeds 200 epg. Review this Drench Decision Guide in late spring or if there are signs of worms[2].

WormTest bucks and wethers after there has been green feed for 6 weeks; treat with an effective drench[1] if egg count exceeds 300 epg. Review this Drench Decision Guide in late spring or if there are signs of worms[2].

WormTest poorer condition goats now (average Condition Score less than 2.5) and treat with an effective drench[1] if the average worm egg count is over 200 epg. Otherwise, continue checking for signs of worms[2] and WormTest if concerned.

Treat with an effective drench[1] and move to a paddock as 'worm-free' as possible and continue to monitor visually (if scouring persists 5 days after drenching seek veterinary advice). WormTest again in 4—6 weeks.

  • Poorer condition goats (average less than Condition Score 2.5): treat now with an effective drench[1].
  • Moderate/good condition goats (average Condition Score 2.5 or more): WormTest now and drench if average worm egg count exceeds 200 epg. After, continue checking for signs of worms[2] and WormTest if concerned.

Treat at weaning with an effective drench[1] and move to a paddock as 'worm-free' as possible. Continue checking for signs of worms[2] and WormTest if kids are not growing to expectation.

Continue checking for signs of worms[1] from summer through to next spring and WormTest if concerned.

Continue checking for signs of worms[1] from autumn through spring and WormTest if goats are losing condition.

Note: WormTests at key times (does: pre-kidding; other goats: winter or spring) will establish an annual pattern and indicate whether routine treatments are necessary.

This recommendation should be read with the information provided below.


1Guidelines for worm control treatments

When using anthelmintic products in goats, obtain a veterinary prescription because:

  • Goats require a different dose rate and withholding period to that on the label.
  • Many drenches are not registered for use in goats (see exceptions below).

Victoria: over the counter sheep drenches can be used if residues are kept below the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL).

South Australia: cattle drenches can be used in goats, but pour-on formulations should be avoided.

When giving all treatments

Follow the product labels. Dose to the heaviest goat in the mob. Calibrate equipment to ensure the right dose is delivered with the right procedures. Do not mix drenches unless the label states they are compatible. Check and comply with withholding periods and export slaughter intervals.

Choosing treatment options on your property

Use these principles together, where possible:

  1. Use drenches tested to be most effective on your property and either multi-active products or more than one active concurrently (up the race with one and then the other); if drench effectiveness is unknown, conduct a DrenchCheck after drenching.
  2. Use short-acting treatments—reserve long-acting products for specific purposes or high worm-risk times.

For more details read the drench resistance section in the WormBoss Worm Control Program.

Long-acting treatments

These are rarely necessary in Western Australia as pasture planning can provide similar options without the risk that drench resistance may develop more rapidly when long-acting treatments are used. You should seek expert advice before using them; more details can be found in the WormBoss Worm Control Program.


2Signs of worms

Scour worms (black scour worm [Trichostrongylus species]; brown stomach worm [Teladorsagia circumcincta]; and others [incl. Nematodirus]): dark scours; weight loss; death.

Barber's pole worm: anaemia (pale inside eyelids and gums); 'bottle jaw' (swelling under the jaw); lethargy, lagging or collapse when mustered; death.

NOTE: Other diseases or poor nutrition can cause similar signs. Consult your veterinarian if WormTests do not indicate worms.


3High risk worm conditions

Goats can sometimes be rapidly re-infected with worms, occasionally causing illness and death within a month of a drench when WECs will still be low or zero. If the onset of scouring, weight loss or deaths is sudden, urgently seek veterinary advice.