WormBoss

Drench Decision Guide

Qld/NSW Summer rainfall/slopes and plains

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Future events cannot reliably be predicted accurately. ParaBoss, UNE and Sheep CRC makes no statement, representations or warranties about the accuracy or completeness of, and you should not rely on any information relating to the Drench Decision Guide ('Information'). ParaBoss, UNE and Sheep CRC disclaims all responsibility for the Information and all liability (including without limitation liability and negligence) for all expenses, costs, losses and damages you may incur as a result of the Information being inaccurate or incomplete in any way for any reason.
Are these sheep showing signs[1] of worms or have they been in high worm-risk conditions (or are you returning to this Drench Decision Guide from a previous recommendation)?

1Signs of worms

Closely examine for signs of worms, yard or hold sheep against a fence. Catch and examine 5—10 animals.

Barber's pole worm: anaemia (pale inside eyelids and gums); 'bottle jaw' (swelling under the jaw); lagging or collapse when mustered; death.

Scour worms (black scour worm [Trichostrongylus species]; brown stomach worm [Teladorsagia circumcinta]; and others [incl. Nematodirus]): dark scours; weight loss; death.

NOTE: Other diseases can cause similar signs. Consider seeking veterinary advice.

Are these ewes that will lamb within 4 weeks?
Are these lambs that will be weaned within 2 weeks or weaners?
What time of the year is it?
It is October–November: Which situation applies to this mob?
It is March–September: Has there been rain (more than 20 mm) plus follow up rain (more than 10 mm) within a few weeks?
I have a WormTest result.
In the table below, find the worm egg count threshold for the class of sheep and the type of WormTest result you have.
Worm egg count (epg) thresholds
Class of sheepNo cultureLess than 60% barber's poleGreater than 60% barber's pole
Ewes (dry to mid-pregnancy) or wethers500400800
Ewes pre-lambing300300300
Sheep under 18 months or rams400300500

What is your worm egg count in relation to the threshold value?

WormBoss Drench Decision Guide Report

Region: Qld/NSW Summer rainfall/slopes and plains

Date: %28 %May %2016

Your Selections

History of selection will appear here

Your Recommended Action

Treat now with a short-acting drench[1] effective against both barber's pole worm and scour worms; WormTest in 4—6 weeks[2] after a short-acting drench. Consider a long-acting treatment for barber's pole worm under higher rainfall conditions; follow the guidelines[1] below for long-acting treatments. Remember that other parasites/diseases can cause similar signs.

WormTest with a larval culture now, then return to this Drench Decision Guide to see if the worm egg count indicates the need for drenching.

The sheep probably have nodule worm. Treat with a short-acting drench[1] effective against nodule worm* in your next drench or in May/June (when frosty weather begins) and in September/October.

*Nodule worm drenches must contain either a benzimidazole (BZ) or a macrocyclic lactone (ML) group.

Treat at weaning with a short-acting drench[1] effective against both scour worms and barber's pole worm; WormTest in 4—6 weeks[2] after a short-acting drench. Consider a long-acting treatment for barber's pole worm under higher rainfall conditions; follow the guidelines[1] below for long-acting drenches.

WormTest in 4 weeks (summer) or 6 weeks (winter) after the last effective short-acting drench was given, then return to this Drench Decision Guide to see if the worm egg count indicates the need for drenching. If the last drench was mid- or long-acting, follow the guidelines[2] below for long-acting drenches. Observe sheep closely for signs of worms between drenching and worm testing[3].

No treatment is required if these sheep were treated in October/November; if they were not, WormTest now, then return to this Drench Decision Guide to see if the worm egg count indicates the need for drenching.

WormTest representative mobs (with a larval culture).

  • If the egg count is below 200 epg no treatment is required.
  • If the egg count is 200—500 epg, treat all sheep now with a short-acting drench[1] effective against barber's pole worm, scour worms (and nodule worm* if present).
  • If the egg count is above 500 epg and the culture shows barber's pole worm is present at greater than 40%, treat all sheep now with a drench[1] effective against barber's pole worm, scour worms (and nodule worm* if present), but consider a long-acting treatment for barber's pole worm.

If no treatment was required or a short-acting drench was used WormTest again in 4—6 weeks[2]. If a long-acting drench was used, follow the guidelines[1] below for long-acting drenches.

*Nodule worm drenches must contain either a benzimidazole (BZ) or a macrocyclic lactone (ML) group.

Treat now with a short-acting drench[1] effective against barber's pole worm, scour worms (and nodule worm* if present). WormTest again in 4—6 weeks[2].

*Nodule worm drenches must contain either a benzimidazole (BZ) or a macrocyclic lactone (ML) group.

Older sheep under drier conditions with no signs of worms do not need drenching. WormTest in late February.

No treatment is required, WormTest during March–September once there has been significant rain (20+ mm) with follow up rain (10+ mm) within a few weeks, or prior to mustering sheep for management activities.

Treat now with a short-acting drench[1] effective against scour worms, barber's pole worm (and nodule worm* if present). In 4—6 weeks follow this Drench Decision Guide again from the beginning with this mob. Consider a long-acting treatment for barber's pole worm under higher rainfall conditions. Follow the guidelines[1] below for long-acting drenches.

*Nodule worm drenches must contain either a benzimidazole (BZ) or a macrocyclic lactone (ML) group.

No treatment is required. If the mob was scouring, investigate other causes including coccidiosis, green feed and hypersensitivity. In 4—6 weeks follow this Drench Decision Guide again from the beginning with this mob.

This recommendation should be read with the information provided below.


1High risk barber's pole worm conditions

Sheep can sometimes be rapidly re-infected with worms, causing illness and death within 2 weeks of a drench. In these situations (i) check at least weekly for visual signs of barber's pole worm; (ii) use the Haemonchus Dipstick Test; and (iii) conduct a DrenchCheck-Day10. To reduce this risk, prepare low worm-risk pastures.


1Signs of worms

Closely examine for signs of worms, yard or hold sheep against a fence. Catch and examine 5—10 animals.

Barber's pole worm: anaemia (pale inside eyelids and gums); 'bottle jaw' (swelling under the jaw); lagging or collapse when mustered; death.

Scour worms (black scour worm [Trichostrongylus species]; brown stomach worm [Teladorsagia circumcinta]; and others [incl. Nematodirus]): dark scours; weight loss; death.

NOTE: Other diseases can cause similar signs. Consider seeking veterinary advice.


1Guidelines for worm control treatments to slow drench resistance

When giving all treatments

Follow the product labels. Dose to the heaviest sheep in the mob or groups. Calibrate equipment to ensure the right dose is delivered with the right procedures. Do not mix drenches unless the label states they are compatible. Check withholding periods and export slaughter intervals.

Choosing treatment options on your property

Use these 4 principles together, where possible:

  1. Use drenches most effective on your property; ideally those shown to reduce worm egg count by at least 98%. If drench effectiveness is unknown, conduct a DrenchCheck-Day10 after drenching.
  2. Use a combination of 2 or more drench groups.
  3. Rotate drench groups each time a mob is drenched and for each paddock.
  4. Use short-acting treatments.

For more details read the drench resistance section in the WormBoss Worm Control Program.

Check effectiveness of long-acting treatments

WormTest with a culture at 60 and 90 days after treatment.

If WormTest results are 100 epg or above, drench resistance is likely. Drench immediately with an effective short-acting drench with a different active to the long-acting treatment.

Seek professional advice on the further use of this product.

If WormTest results are less than 100 epg, then treat with an exit drench at 100 days (15 weeks) after the long-acting treatment was given.

Seek professional advice if WormTests are positive at or before 60 days.

Primer and exit drenches

These help to slow drench resistance to persistent treatments.

Protection period of persistent treatments

Mid-length: 7—28 days. Long-acting: 91—100 days.

NOTE: The protection period against susceptible black scour worm with a long-acting moxidectin injection is 49 days.

Use a primer before long-acting treatments

Primer drenches (effective short-acting treatments that do not include the active in the long-acting treatment) should be given concurrently with all long-acting treatments.

Use an exit drench after all mid-length and long-acting treatments

  • Treat with an 'exit drench'—an effective short-acting treatment that does not include the active in the mid-length or long-acting treatment. Also called a 'tail-cutter' drench.
  • Give this at 6 weeks (mid-length) or 15 weeks (long-acting) after the treatment was given.
  • WormTest 4—6 weeks after the exit drench.

Anytime that you are concerned that the persistent treatment is not providing protection, WormTest immediately and seek professional advice regarding drench resistance.