Paid Advertisement
 




Drench groups and actives


Sheep

Drench groups and actives Worms Examples* of brand names/comments

BZ or benzimidazole group (‘white’)B

albendazole
fenbendazole
oxfendazole

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, adult liver fluke, nodule worm, aids control of intestinal tapeworm (Moniezia)

Valbazen (albendazole)
WSD Fenbendazole (fenbendazole)
Oxfen (oxfendazole)

LV or levamisole group (‘clear’)B

       levamisole    

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, nodule worm

Nilverm, Levamisole Gold

ML or macrocyclic lactone groupB (sometimes called ‘mectins’)

       Ivermectin
       abamectin
       moxidectin

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, nodule worm

Ivomec, Noromectin (ivermectin)
Absolute, Vetmec, Paramectin (abamectin)
Cydectin, Moxitak (moxidectin)

 

AD or amino-acetonitrile derivative groupB

       monepantel

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’ Zolvix

SI or spiroindole groupM

       derquantel

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’,  nodule worm

Derquantel is only found in a combination: Startect (abamectin + derquantel)

OP or organophosphate groupM

naphthalophos (NAP)

(OPs have lower or variable efficacy against ‘scour worms’ in the upper GIT and immature barber’s pole worm)

barber’s pole worm, 'scour worms’

Rametin, (naphthalophos is commonly used in combinations)

TZ or benzimidazole group (flukicide)N

       triclabendazole

Liver fluke (all stages); not effective against round worms Fasinex, Tremacide, Exifluke

SA or salicylanilides/phenols groupN

closantel

Liver fluke (> 9 weeks and adult) and barber’s pole worm

Closicare, Sustain

IQ or isoquinolone groupN

       praziquantel

Intestinal tapeworm (Moniezia) PraziquantelN is only available in combination with broad-spectrum drenches.  First DrenchB, Genesis TapeB

*ParaBoss does not endorse specific brands, these are presented here as examples only.

Breadth of activity across different worm species: BBroad-spectrum; MMid-spectrum; NNarrow-spectrum

Actives: An ‘active’ is the chemical in a drench responsible for killing worms. Some drenches have more than one active and are called ‘multi-active’ or ‘combination’ drenches.

Combination or multi-active treatments: Proprietary treatments containing more than one active. Formulated to be compatible as a mixture. Note: Do not mix your own drenches unless the labels state that you can.

Product formulation: All single actives are available as oral drenches. Moxidectin is also available in injectable products. Intra-ruminal/controlled release capsules are available with BZ and/or ML actives. Abamectin is also in a pour-on formulation for both lice and worm control.

Length of protection: Varies from short-acting (‘knock-down’ that kills susceptible worms within the animal) to mid-length (1–6 weeks) and long-acting (approx. 3 months), which not only kill susceptible worms already in the animals, but also infective larvae that the sheep eat during the protection period.

‘Scour worms’: Mainly black scour worm and (small) brown stomach worm, but also others.

Label: Check product labels for full details. Follow the label.

Other parasites: ‘Drenches’ shows effectiveness of groups against other parasites of minor importance.



Goats


Drench groups and actives for goats

Drench groups and actives Worms Examples* of brand names/comments

BZ or benzimidazole group (‘white’)B

albendazole
fenbendazole
oxfendazole

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, adult liver fluke, nodule worm, aids control of intestinal tapeworm (Moniezia)

Alben, Valbazen, WSD Albendazole (albendazole)
Beezed, Fenbender 25, Panacur 25, (fenbendazole)
Beezed LV, Oxfen LV (oxfendazole)

LV or levamisole group (‘clear’)B

       morantel
      levamisole    

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, nodule worm

Oralject (morantel citrate)
None registered (levamisole)

ML or macrocyclic lactone groupB (sometimes called ‘mectins’)

       Ivermectin
       abamectin
       moxidectin

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’, nodule worm

None registered (ivermectin)
Caprimec (abamectin)
None registered (moxidectin)  

 

AD or amino-acetonitrile derivative groupB

       monepantel

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’ None registered

SI or spiroindole groupM

       derquantel

barber’s pole worm, ‘scour worms’,  nodule worm

None registered

OP or organophosphate groupM

naphthalophos (NAP)

(OPs have lower or variable efficacy against ‘scour worms’ in the upper GIT and immature barber’s pole worm)

barber’s pole worm, 'scour worms’

None registered

TZ or benzimidazole group (flukicide)N

       triclabendazole

Liver fluke (all stages); not effective against round worms Flukare C

SA or salicylanilides/phenols groupN

closantel

Liver fluke (> 9 weeks and adult) and barber’s pole worm

None registered

IQ or isoquinolone groupN

       praziquantel

Intestinal tapeworm (Moniezia) None registered

*These are all of the commercial anthelmintics registered and commercially available for goats at August 2016. In most states of Australia, sheep drenches can be used in goats with an off-label veterinary prescription. 

Breadth of activity across different worm species: BBroad-spectrum; MMid-spectrum; NNarrow-spectrum

Actives: An ‘active’ is the chemical in a drench responsible for killing worms. Some drenches have more than one active and are called ‘multi-active’ or ‘combination’ drenches.

Combination or multi-active treatments: Proprietary treatments containing more than one active. Formulated to be compatible as a mixture. Note: Do not mix your own drenches unless the labels state that you can.

Product formulation: All single actives are available as oral drenches. Moxidectin is also available in injectable products. Moxidectin is not registered for use in goats and an off-label prescription is required from your veterinarian. Pour-on products should not be used in goats for worm control.

Length of protection: Varies from short-acting (‘knock-down’ that kills susceptible worms within the animal) to mid-length (1–6 weeks) and long-acting (approx. 3 months), which not only kill susceptible worms already in the animals, but also infective larvae that the goats eat during the protection period.

‘Scour worms’: Mainly black scour worm and (small) brown stomach worm, but also others.

Label: Check product labels for full details. Follow the label or veterinarian’s instructions. 

Using sheep drenches in goats: Veterinarians can prescribe sheep drenches for goats, but must provide written details of withholding periods and dose rates.

Other parasites: ‘Drenches’ shows effectiveness of groups against other parasites of minor importance.